Oil & Gas

At a Glance
  • Because oil and gas extraction is typically more capital intensive than mineral extraction, it tends to generate comparatively lower levels of direct employment. 
  • Opportunities for a local workforce are often limited due to a combination of two factors: i) the sector is knowledge and technology intensive rather than labor intensive, and; ii) education and vocational training programs have not been in place long enough to produce the type and level of skills required.
  • Major societal, technological, and political trends are reshaping the environment in which oil and gas companies operate, driving potentially game-changing disruptions in the way they organize their operations. 
  • New job classes and capability profiles are emerging to increase operational agility, allow industry wide cooperation, and re-focus technical levelson sophisticated analyses.
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[1] Christopher Handscomb, Scott Sharabura, and Jannik Woxholth , “The oil and gas organization of the future”, Mckinsey & Company Oil and Gas, September 2016

Key Resources

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Knowledge Based Oil and Gas Industry

The study evaluates the Norwegian upstream oil and gas industries according to the underlying dimensions of a global knowledge hub - cluster ...

Mapping and Analysis of the Needs for Petroleum Related Education in Tanzania

This report maps and analyzes the need for petroleum related education in Tanzania. It provides an understanding of the gaps in demand and ...

Oil and Gas Reality Check 2015: A Look at the Top Issues Facing the Oil and Gas Sector

This report analyzes six key issues impacting gas and oil industry, with a particular focus on the upstream market. Pages 16 to19 provide a ...

Skills Shortages in a Booming Market: The Big Oil and Gas Challenge

This resource provides several useful insights into the forces shaping labour demand in the oil and gas industry. Through extensive ...

Oil and Gas is Facing a Severe Talent Shortage

The article provides several insights into the oil and gas labour market in the Middle East, including a discussion of the prospects for ...

Oil & Gas is Facing a Severe Talent Shortage

The article provides several insights into the oil and gas labour market in the Middle East, including a discussion of the prospects for ...

Topic Briefing

In general, oil and gas extraction are more capital intensive than mineral extraction. As a result, it generates comparatively lower levels of direct employment. A recent study by the International Finance Corporation (IFC) on the potential for local employment generation arising from the development of three oil and gas projects in Ghana found that opportunities for the local workforce were limited because of a combination of two factors:  i) the sector is knowledge and technology intensive rather than labor intensive, and; ii) the oil and gas sector is a recent addition to the economy which means that education and vocational training programs have not been in place for enough time to produce the type and level of skills required.

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On the other hand, major societal, technological, and political trends are reshaping the environment in which oil and gas companies operate, driving potentially game-changing disruption in the way they organize their operations. Technological advances are affecting the type and profile of jobs, including technically skilled labor requiring increased human-machine interaction.[1] For example, advances in data generation and treatment creates opportunity to re-invent how and where work gets done. New job classes and capability profile are emerging to increase operational agility (through decentralized operations that bring decision making closer to the job site), to allow industry wide cooperation (through common standards and the interaction with increasingly sophisticated vendors and supply-chain relationships), and to re-focus technical levels on sophisticated analyses (while more standard problems are handled by machines).