Direct Jobs

  • Strategies that target the extractive industry may establish targets for local recruitment in legislation or agreements, and/or focus on closing the skills gap through training and other targeted capacity building programs.
  • Many larger mining companies have established their own trade schools, often in cooperation with local school authorities, to provide apprenticeship programs and support local technical and vocational training.
  • The extractive industry employs relatively few women, though newer initiatives increasingly aim to create a more balanced and diverse workforce.
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[1] ICMM, Chile, The Challenge of Mineral Wealth: using resource endowments to foster sustainable development, (March 2007)

Key Resources

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Diavik Diamonds Project Socio-Economic Monitoring Agreement

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How to Create Employment Opportunities in a Remote Mining Area of Canada

This report offers a concise explanation of the challenges and solutions applied at Voisey's Bay in Canada, a large nickel mine far from any ...

Local Content Norway Petroleum

The approach taken by Norway, as described in this summary, is less coercive than local content regulations in other countries. It provides ...

Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry Content Development Act, 2010

An extensive document outlining the application and review of Nigeria's local content law. The Nigerian model offers an example of very ...

Promoting Gender Equality in the Private Sector - Hiring Women in Mining Production Jobs

This brief discusses an innovative solution to gender disparities in the mining industry by using Programa Mujer, an initiative of ...

The Lonmin-IFC Women in Mining Program

This case study explores efforts made by Lonmin in promotion of the employment and retention of women in the workforce. It focuses on ...

Guidance for Governments, Local Content Policies

This resource is intended to direct policy-makers toward country specific solutions regarding local content policies. The guide outlines ...

Topic Briefing

Government strategies to ensure its citizens have the necessary job skills used in extractive industries can either focus on the sector project itself, or on the wider skills environment. The second type of strategies are dealt with under the subtopic Educational Policy.

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Strategies that target extractive industry specifically may establish targets for local recruitment in legislation or agreements, and/or focus on closing the skills gap through training and other targeted capacity building programs. Apprenticeship programs and support to local technical and vocational training often play an important part and many larger mining companies have established their own trade schools, often in cooperation with the local school authorities. One example is the CEIM, (Centro de Entrenamiento Industrial y Minero) which is the Industrial and Mining Training Centre in Antofagasta, Chile, founded in 1999 by the Escondida Educational Foundation and established by the Escondida mining company.[1] It is a non-profit organization whose main mission is to foster excellence in the mining industry. The Center has been reinforced through an alliance between Escondida and 20 other companies. The Escondida Foundation has handed over the Centre to local educational authorities.

Governments can use a mix of push and pull strategies. The IGF Guidance for Governments in the key resource below (pages 35 to 51) details policy options for the mining sector, most of which are also valid for the oil and gas sector.

The extractive industry employs relatively few women. But a few initiatives, mainly corporate, target women in extractives with the aim to create a more balanced and diverse workforce. “The Lonmin-IFC Women in Mining Program” and “Promoting Gender Equality in the Private Sector - Hiring Women in Mining Production Jobs” initiatives are described in the key resources below.