Building Job Skills Required by Extractives

At a Glance

  • Focusing that produces external economies of scale. But while this might be an effective long-term growth strategy, in the short term there may be greater returns to preparing people for lower-skilled—and more numerous—jobs.

  • It is best if vocational training is designed to meet the needs of the economy as a whole, rather than a specific extractive industry or company. Cooperative approaches tend to work particularly well toward this goal.

  • Training must also consider the changing nature of the work in extractive industries, as increasing automation and digitization demand new skills of workers.

Case Studies

Key Resources

See more resources

Current and Future Skills, Human Resources Development and Safety Training for Contractors in the Oil and Gas Industry

This resource provides an analysis of employment trends and draws conclusions about essential skills and training. Points of consensus are ...

From Mines and Wells to Well-Built Minds: Turning Sub-Saharan Africa's Natural Resource Wealth into Human Capital

This report provides an overview of the challenges faced by natural-resource-dependent countries with respect to building human capital. ...

Global Dialogue Forum on Future Needs for Skills and Training in the Oil and Gas Industry

This report provides various stakeholders’ perspectives, and reflects varying priorities and preferred policy approaches to skills ...

Strategies for Improving Miners' Training

A broad discussion of training needs and methods in the mining industry is presented in this report, including practical advice for ...

Why do Some Oil-rich Countries Perform Better Than Others?

This article presents an empirical model for prioritizing education in countries that depend on extractive industries. With education ...

Mind the Gap: Training Mining Workers for a Digital Future

This article discusses how digitalization will change the work of miners and increase the skills gap. The importance of investing in human ...

Mapping the Oil and Gas Industry to the Sustainable Development Goals: An Atlas

This resource examines the links between the oil and gas industry and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), supporting a shared ...

Topic Briefing

Becoming a technician or skilled worker often requires vocational training; this training may not be available in extractive projects’ areas of influence. Accordingly, many extractive companies conduct their own vocational training. While this provides benefits for the host country, it can be more advantageous if training is designed to meet the needs of the economy as a whole, rather than just the needs of the particular extractive company coordinating it. Cooperative approaches have often worked well in this context.

Read more

Training also must consider the changing nature of the work in extractive industries, as increasing automation and digitization demand new skills of workers. For more on the changing nature of the oil and gas industry, see Understanding The Job Needs Of Extractives.

Finally, the training needs of the sectors where indirect or induced employment occurs should not be neglected—even if these involve low-level skills. For example, the consumption spending of well-paid employees can be better captured if the host economy can provide high-quality hospitality services. Thus, even if hospitality services are not core to extractive industry activity, developing skills in these services could result in significant revenue for the host economy.

Also, training small and medium enterprises can increase employment by expanding local procurement as discussed in the Supplying Extractives topic. For more details on training current and potential suppliers of extractive industries, see Building The Capacity Of Local Businesses.